Critical thinking is the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication, as a guide to belief and action.

Producing your dissertation is not an open-ended task.  Between the start of your research, and the deadline for submission, there are a number of tasks that need to be undertaken in sequence.  Your management of this process is an essential part of undertaking the unit.  The tasks to be undertaken depend upon the methodology you have devised for your dissertatio.

The focus of ergonomics is on the individual. In the design of work, and all aspects of the work, the human (either as the worker, operator or user) must always remain central in our considerations; thus it is not possible to undertake ergonomic surveys or audits of work places, or work systems, without considering the people who are involved. Design for human use should therefore be based on the characteristics of the users.

The course aims to:

  • Explore, evaluate and build on the existing theory and practice associated with chemical hazards found in the workplace;
  • Introduce and develop an appreciation and understanding of risk that the different types of chemical hazards can present to workers and other people affected by them;
  • Develop a framework for rational decision making in managing chemical hazards in the workplace;
  • Develop skills and decision-making when presented with chemical hazards in the workplace.

The term physical agents include a range of energy-based workplace hazards including noise, vibration, temperature, lighting, ionising and non-ionising radiation and pressure.  This is not an exhaustive list and there can be overlap between the different risks.  Each of these hazards can expose workers to the risk of serious injury, permanent disability or even death.  Across the world the dangers presented by these risks are being increasingly recognised by governments and legislation controlling them continues to be introduced or made more rigorous.

The contents of this course fall essentially into two parts.  The first part is with general aspects of health and safety management, such as its organisation, its application and its relationship to the management of other aspects of an organisation.  Whilst the second part discussed the actual management of risk itself, the techniques, training and organisational requirements to do this effectively.  The two parts together form a total system for the proper and effective management of health and safety.

For many people, the prospect of embarking on a research project is daunting.  However, if the research project is properly managed then there is no reason why the pursuit of research should not be an enjoyable and ultimately rewarding activity.  Dr Martin Barnes, an ex-chairperson of the Association of Project Managers (APM) has described a project as a task or activity which has a beginning (start), a middle and an end; despite much research being carried out as part of a long term 'rolling' programme each individual package of research is, itself, a project - an entity complete in itself, whilst contributing to the overall programme.

As the impact on the environment of human activity becomes more and more apparent, the role of environmental management in organisations is increasingly being added to the duties of the safety professional.  Environmental management is being recognised by many organisations as not just being good for the planet, but also good for business as customers and clients seek suppliers and contractors with a strong environmental ethos.

With increasing national and international concern about the environment, it is inevitable that the involvement of many safety professionals in environmental management will increase and this course is intended to provide a general introduction to environmental management, what it is and why it is important.